The 7 Best Questions to Ask at the End of an Interview

Job interview conversations often lack the back and forth discussion needed to impress a hiring manager….especially towards the end of the discussion.

Here are the 7 best questions to ask at the end of an interview to impress your interviewer and help you win the job.

Questions for Hiring Manager

best questions to ask at the end of an interview


Questions Answered

  • What are the best questions to ask at the end of an interview

  • How many questions should you ask at the end of an interview


Many job interviews in today's work world feel one-sided and more like an interrogation, but they shouldn't! 

You need to be as comfortable with the organization as they are with you.

Interviews should be a back-and-forth conversation, with questions and answers going both ways. 

The key to a good interview is to bring up questions for the hiring manager. Well thought-out questions that revolve around the position. 

But what does that look like? 

Source: imgflip

Source: imgflip


How many interviews come before a job offer? According to recruiters: Three - 51% | Four - 22% | Two - 17% | 5 or More - 9% | One - 1%
— Sentiment Study MRI Network

Here are the 7 best questions to ask your interviewer

Question for Interviewer #1

"What do the daily responsibilities of the role entail?"

We spend the majority of our time at work, so understanding what goes into each day plays a large part in your happiness and success as an employee.

It's also crucial to have a grasp and understanding of how a company measures success for your particular position. 

Question for Interviewer #2

"What's your favorite part about working at the company?" or "What does the work-life balance look like?"

Most hiring managers have a good idea about what they enjoy and dislike about working for their employer.

Ask what they love and listen to HOW they say it, not just what they say. If there's passion or a smile behind it, it's a good sign. 

Ask others within the office what the work-life balance looks like if you get time to chat or job shadow. They will likely be more inclined to give you an honest answer than leadership. 

If answers conflict with what the hiring manager said, this might not be the best fit! 

Question for Interviewer #3

"Based on what you've heard during our interview, what can I do to improve or better myself moving forward?"

This is by far our FAVORITE question to ask an employer (and my favorite to receive when hiring new employees).

This shows your commitment to learning and provides valuable feedback around what you can do to improve moving forward. 

Plus, it provides you an opportunity to respond to any potential concerns.


Question for Interviewer #4

"What are the company's values?"

Knowing the values of the company and individuals who work there can help you make a decision when the job offer comes through.

You don't want to work for someone or something you don't believe in. 

Prior research and this simple question can help get the information you need to make a great decision.  

Question for Interviewer #5

"Are there opportunities to grow within the company?"

When asking about an opportunity to grow within the company, bring up questions around whether the company has learning and development programs as well. 

Great employers will want to see you grow, so if there's no opportunity to do so, it might not be the best fit! 



Question for Interviewer #6

"What does your ideal candidate look like?"

Understanding what skills and requirements fit within the role is not only crucial for the employer to understand; but crucial for you to understand as well. 

After the interviewer answers the question, reassure them you possess those traits with examples of when you displayed those characteristics. 

Question for Interviewer #7

"What are the major challenges I might face within this position?"

This question helps put yourself in the employer’s mind, so they can picture you working the role (while they answer the question).

Respond by telling them you've been in similar situations in the past and then explain how you resolved them. 


How many questions should you ask at the end of an interview?

Look to ask at least two to three questions at the end of your job interview. This will demonstrate your interest in the position along with proving to the hiring manager that you are a well organized/prepared candidate (thus taken seriously).


Wrapping Up | Best Questions to Ask at the End of an Interview

Remember, the 7 questions we provided are just examples and a general guide to help. Understand what's important to you, pick your favorites, and write them down before your interview.

  1. "What do the daily responsibilities of the role entail?"

  2. "What's your favorite part about working at the company?"

  3. "Based on what you've heard during our interview, what can I do to improve or better myself moving forward?"

  4. "What are the company's values?"

  5. "Are there opportunities to grow within the company?"

  6. "What does your ideal candidate look like?"

  7. "What are the major challenges I might face in this position?"

Many interviewees refuse to ask questions because they don't feel qualified or confident enough to do so. Don't be that person!

The ones who ask questions are often the ones who stick out to hiring managers in the end.

Best of luck! 

Quick Note: Type out your questions and bring them to the interview. There's no need to memorize them. This shows the interviewer you are prepared, and it provides a sheet to take notes from while they answer.

 

Title: 7 Best Questions to Ask the Interviewer

Category: theInterview

Tags: Questions for Interviewer, Best questions to ask the interviewer, Great interview questions to ask employer, Questions for hiring manager, top questions to ask an interviewer, what questions should I ask an interviewer, questions to ask in a job interview as the employee


Author: Reid is a contributor to theJub. He's an employment and marketing enthusiast who studied business before taking on various recruiting, management, and marketing roles. More from the author.